Columbus State University Archives

“Nova Belgica et Anglia Nova.” Willem Janszoom Blaeu. Based on Adrian
Block’s 1614 map and published in Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, 1635.

Title

“Nova Belgica et Anglia Nova.” Willem Janszoom Blaeu. Based on Adrian
Block’s 1614 map and published in Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, 1635.

Description

The primary source for this work was a map produced by Adrian Block in 1614. Working for fellow fur traders within the Dutch West India Company, Block explored and mapped the coast between Cape Cod and Manhattan. His was the first map to show Manhattan as an island and to label “Manhates” and Niev Nederlandt.” By naming Adrian Block Island, off the coast of Rhode Island, he insured continuing fame. Block used de Laet’s 1630 work and Samuel de Champlain’s 1612 map. Block placed north to the right as was the case with John White and John Smith’s maps.

Willem Janzsoon Blaeu, a Dutch cartographer, took Block’s work, expanded it, and produced one of the most beautiful maps of the period. Animals such as beavers, polecats, and otters appear here for the first time on a European publication. A Mohawk village based on John White’s drawings published by de Bry views for attention with sailing ships and Indian canoes.

Blaeu, who was educated by the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe, began a cartographic tradition that established his family for generations as the leading map, globe, and atlas publisher during the golden are of Dutch map making.

Date

1635

Files

Blaeu_NewEngland.png

Citation

““Nova Belgica et Anglia Nova.” Willem Janszoom Blaeu. Based on Adrian
Block’s 1614 map and published in Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, 1635.,” Columbus State University Archives, accessed November 20, 2017, http://digitalarchives.columbusstate.edu/items/show/15.

Social Bookmarking