Columbus State University Archives

Noua Terrae-Mariae Tabula, or Lord Baltimore’s Map, 1635. Second edition by John Ogilby, 1671.

Title

Noua Terrae-Mariae Tabula, or Lord Baltimore’s Map, 1635. Second edition by John Ogilby, 1671.

Description

Always known as Lord Baltimore’s map, this is the first depiction of Maryland as a separate colony. Two “adventurers” among the first colonizers, Jerome Hawley and John Lewger, probably drew the map. They obviously used John Smith’s map; the delineations are similar, and both share the same north-facing right orientation. While Smith provides a more accurate image of the Chesapeake Bay, Hawley and Lewger did some surveying and added more details. This was the first published map to label the James and Rappahannock Rivers correctly. With the Calvert family’s coat of arms prominently displayed, this map was produced as a compliment to a pamphlet (also written by Hawley and Lewger) designed to attract settlers to this Catholic refuge. Only twenty copies of the pamphlet with the original map are preserved in libraries in the U.S. and the U.K. John Ogilby issued a second edition of this map in his America (1671). Earlier scholars asserted that Ogilby used the 1635 plate for his image, but later ones challenge that assertion because of Ogilby’s additions. He labelled the ten Maryland counties that existed in 1671. His new version had an extra row of trees along the northern border, and he moved that boundary northward to the 40th parallel, a detail missing from the original, but one certainly supported by the Baltimore family. This map is Ogilby’s edition. (Information from Huntingfield Map Collection, The Maryland State Archives.)

Date

1671

Files

Ogilby_Maryland.png

Tags

Citation

“Noua Terrae-Mariae Tabula, or Lord Baltimore’s Map, 1635. Second edition by John Ogilby, 1671.,” Columbus State University Archives, accessed November 20, 2017, http://digitalarchives.columbusstate.edu/items/show/14.

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