Columbus State University Archives

Browse Items (2427 total)

Oglethorpe_Savannah_1735.png
The precise history of this map, drawn a year after the settlement of Savannah, is shrouded in mystery, but most scholars see the hand of James Edward Oglethorpe, “Georgia’s cartographically astute founder,” as being involved in drawing and…

Hinton_Georgia_1779.png
Perhaps the last map printed of Georgia as a colony, this appeared in J. Hinton’s Universal Magazine, one of several gentlemen’s magazines circulating in London. During the American Revolution, Hinton’s journal included maps of all of the…

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Bowen_Georgia_1744.png
Emanuel Bowen’s map shows the full width of the Georgia colony from the Atlantic to the Mississippi River or French territory in 1748. Harris first published his atlas in 1705 and for the 1744-48 and 1764 editions added a chapter on the history of…

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America_1695.jpg
The title of English Empire in America reflects its 1695 publication date, almost a decade before the Acts of Union of England and Scotland (1706 & 1707) that created the Kingdom of Great Britain and the British Empire. Even so, John Senex…

America_1720.jpg
Known as Moll’s “Sasquesahanok Indian Fort” map after the image in the upper left, the map’s title indicates its design, to refute Guillaume Delisle’s “Carte de la Louisiane” map (1718) that showed circumscribed English land claims…

MC384-5-2-064.jpg
A picture of Lloyd Bryd wearing a baseball hat, standing in front of a brick wall with a baseball glove on his left hand and a baseball in his right hand.

Louisiana_Mississippi_1718.jpg
In the early 18th century, Claude Delisle (1644-1720) and his four sons became the preeminent family of French cartography. The most accomplished was the child prodigy Guillaume Delisle (1675-1726), who served as the chief royal geographer and is…

Lucas_Georgia_1822.png
This was the first American atlas modeled on that of Le Sage’s volume published in Florence, Italy (1806) that focused on European countries and world history. C. V. Lavoisne later produced similar volumes in London. Carey and Lea extended this…

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Scoles_Georgia_1799.png
This image is a copy of Carey’s 1795 map in Guthrie’s Geography with the engraver’s name and date changed. This map continued to be issued unchanged by other printer for at least another ten years. The J. K. Spencer map collection contains two…

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Barker_Georgia_1795.png
Mathew Carey, an Irish immigrant, became the nation’s first large-scale cartographic publisher of American maps and atlases. He sought to make money and to celebrate the new republic. This particular atlas and Joseph Scott’s Gazetteer of 1795…

Unknown_Georgia_1805.png
The first map of Georgia without its western territory appeared in an edition of Carey’s atlas.

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Scott_Georgia_1799.png
The same map first appeared in Scott’s The United States Gazetteer in 1795. Scott and Matthew Carey vie for the claim to have published the first American atlas containing state maps. Scott’s “Georgia” includes very little detailed…

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Martyn_Georgia_1741.png
Benjamin Martyn, the secretary for the Georgia Trustees, published a history of the first nine years of their experiment in social engineering. This volume contained a chronology, reports of the Trustees, letters from James Oglethorpe, and a copy of…

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Barker_Georgia_1801.png
This atlas consisted of 19 maps: an overall U.S., the Northwest Territory, and 17 separate states. The first edition of this work appeared in 1796. Given the format of this portable atlas, its maps were smaller and contained fewer features. In the…

Butts_Georgia_1859.png
This large map (62 x 53 inches) delineates counties, roads, railroads, and factories. It lists governors and their terms of office. Illustrations feature public buildings, colleges, and scenic points such as Toccoa Falls. The land lots, apparently…

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Sturges_Georgia_1818.png
The first wall map of the state of Georgia, it shows towns, roads, military posts, Indian villages. Existing counties and Indian boundaries are shown in color. Tables list post offices, statistics relating to the individual counties, and geological…

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Barker_Georgia_1805.png
Published four years later than the Georgia map in Carey’s 1801 atlas, this later version may have been printed from the same plate with two major additions. All of the information on the 1801 and 1805 versions appears to be the same except the…